How to customize Facebook ads for every stage of your funnel.

By charles kirkland | FaceBook

Aug 24

Sunday while smoking a brisket it occurred to me that cooking is very similar to creating successful Facebook campaigns.

Every stage has its own order. If you skip ahead, you’re doomed to fail.

It's really not about what buttons you push or settings you pick. Those are completely tactical, novice moves.

See, each stage of your buying cycle needs to have its own ad.

Today I am going to go over the concept. Then for the next 7 days I’m going to go into the smallest details of creating Facebook ads that will give you the highest ROI you have ever seen.

For today’s example let's use a 4 stage simple funnel so you can grasp the concept.

Stage 1: Collect the name, email and phone number.

Stage 2: Present the offer and overcome the objections. This can be done via sales letters, phone calls, webinars, etc. The modality may change but the outcome is the same.

Stage 3: Get them to the checkout page and to take the next step.

Stage 4: Get them to become a repeat buyer at higher prices.

Super pro tip.
“Focus on your back end buyers. These buyers are often different from your most prolific front end buyer.”

I optimize my ads for my highest lifetime buyer. Focusing optimization for front end buyers is a fast way to the poor house.

At every stage of this funnel your prospects will have different objections that you need to overcome or they’ll get stuck at their current stage and never progress to the next stage.

The biggest issue is most people create a single ad and hope it will take care of the entire funnel and then they wonder why it's not working.

In order for you to get the maximum results you must make sure you are targeting the right people.

Head over to get my buyer profile checklist and template to make sure you are targeting the right prospects from the start.

http://go.mediabuyerassociation.com/optinpjcyu5d1

STEP 1

In order to engage our prospects to get them to click on our ads we must customize Facebook ads for every stage of our funnel based on our prospect’s biggest, deepest, darkest fears.

We have to tap into these fears so well that it would make a Steven King movie look like an episode of Mr. Rogers Neighborhood.

I want to know what keeps him up at night.
What is he afraid to admit to his spouse?
What has he been secretly daydreaming about?
Why does it bother him so much?

Don’t speed through the this process and go with surface level problems that everybody else sees.

Look at this example.

Let’s pretend that we are promoting a hair loss clinic.

That comes to mind because at 47 I’m slowing losing my hair. Since my dad was a hair stylist, hair is a big deal in my family.

While the competition is talking about getting a full head of hair, we are going to talk about how the lack of hair is killing his self esteem.

We talk about how a woman loves to run her hands through a thick head of hair.

He’s wondering if his wife is looking at other men with more hair.

He’s afraid that he is getting passed over for promotions because of his lack of hair.


You get the point. We have to drill down into those deep fears he’s even afraid to admit to himself.

Once you know his deepest fears, you’re ahead of 99% of your competition.

Our first goal in Stage 1 is to get your prospect to click the ad and hit the landing page.

And the best way to get that click is to talk about his biggest fears.

We’ll do more to avoid pain than to gain pleasure.

Don’t believe me? Look at this example.

Let's say I call you at 2am and tell you Big Jim’s is having a buy-one-get-one-free tire sale. I could only imagine the words you would say.

But if I call and tell you 2 teenagers are stealing your new zero turn lawn mower you would thank me and call 911.

One is pleasure and the other is pain.

Using those pain points, I can craft a number of ads all hitting the same problem in dozens of ways.

I’ll never have a shortage ideas to create amazing ads.

But which type of ad will work best?

Is it your social proof ad, benefit driven ad, or curiosity ads?

Most people create a single ad and a few variations of the exact same thing and wonder what's not working.

Just imagine how much money has been wasted testing the same variation of the wrong kind of ad for your market.

So the question is, which ad type do you use?

You need to keep all these ads running initially because different people will respond to different hooks.

Do me a favor and go back through your last few campaigns and see if you were only running one type of ad.

You’ll be surprised by how many sales you’ve lost by only running 1 angle.

You may even go back to some of your campaigns that were close to breaking even and run a few more ads based on their biggest fears.

It may shock you to find out how close you may have been to a crazy profitable campaign.

In order to engage our prospects to get them to click on our ads we must customize Facebook ads for every stage of our funnel based on our prospect’s biggest, deepest, darkest fears.

We have to tap into these fears so well that it would make a Steven King movie look like an episode of Mr. Rogers Neighborhood.

I want to know what keeps him up at night.
What is he afraid to admit to his spouse?
What has he been secretly daydreaming about?
Why does it bother him so much?

Don’t speed through the this process and go with surface level problems that everybody else sees.

Look at this example.

Let’s pretend that we are promoting a hair loss clinic.

That comes to mind because at 47 I’m slowing losing my hair. Since my dad was a hair stylist, hair is a big deal in my family.

While the competition is talking about getting a full head of hair, we are going to talk about how the lack of hair is killing his self esteem.

We talk about how a woman loves to run her hands through a thick head of hair.

He’s wondering if his wife is looking at other men with more hair.

He’s afraid that he is getting passed over for promotions because of his lack of hair.

You get the point. We have to drill down into those deep fears he’s even afraid to admit to himself.

Once you know his deepest fears, you’re ahead of 99% of your competition.

Our first goal in Stage 1 is to get your prospect to click the ad and hit the landing page.

And the best way to get that click is to talk about his biggest fears.

We’ll do more to avoid pain than to gain pleasure.

Don’t believe me? Look at this example.

Let's say I call you at 2am and tell you Big Jim’s is having a buy-one-get-one-free tire sale. I could only imagine the words you would say.

But if I call and tell you 2 teenagers are stealing your new zero turn lawn mower you would thank me and call 911.

One is pleasure and the other is pain.

Using those pain points, I can craft a number of ads all hitting the same problem in dozens of ways.

I’ll never have a shortage ideas to create amazing ads.

But which type of ad will work best?

Is it your social proof ad, benefit driven ad, or curiosity ads?

Most people create a single ad and a few variations of the exact same thing and wonder what's not working.

Just imagine how much money has been wasted testing the same variation of the wrong kind of ad for your market.

So the question is, which ad type do you use?

You need to keep all these ads running initially because different people will respond to different hooks.

Do me a favor and go back through your last few campaigns and see if you were only running one type of ad.

You’ll be surprised by how many sales you’ve lost by only running 1 angle.

You may even go back to some of your campaigns that were close to breaking even and run a few more ads based on their biggest fears.

It may shock you to find out how close you may have been to a crazy profitable campaign.

========================================
Did you grab the social media buyer profile guide? If not, get it here.

http://go.mediabuyerassociation.com/optinpjcyu5d1

========================================














Follow

About the Author

Charles is a walking, talking, networking blend of credibility and know-how. Raised in a working class family, he combined a tenacious work ethic and keen sense of curiosity to usher him over one hurdle after another.